Proportion in Musical Scales | Sacred Geometry

“Sacred Geometry is the geometry underlying Life in all of its forms. We can see it everywhere in Nature. In this context the word Sacred has nothing to do with religion. This site is devoted to the study and dissemination of knowledge about Sacred Geometry. I work to keep it as simple as possible, because there is no commercial interest behind it.”

Link to Website

Proportion in Musical Scales

MIMO – Musical Instrument Museums Online

Explore the world collections of musical instruments:

MIMO

Welcome to the world’s largest freely accessible database for information on musical instruments held in public collections. Our database now contains the records of 55535 instruments.

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120 Years Of Electronic Music

120 Years of Electronic Music* is a project that outlines and analyses the history and development of electronic musical instruments from around 1880 onwards.

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Press Here To Enter The Main Site: 120 Years Of Electronic Music 

The ideas put forward in Ferrucio Busoni’s ‘Sketch of a New Aesthetic of Music’ (1907) inspired a generation of composers to explore micro-tonal and varied intonation and Hermann von Helmholtz’s ‘On the Sensations of Tone’ (1863) provided an understanding of the physics of sound suggesting the possibility of creating an unlimited palette of tones and shapes beyond the restriction of traditional instrumentation. This lead directly to the design of several new instrument; Thadeus Cahill’s Telharmonium (1897) and Jörg Mager’s Sphäraphon (1920s) amongst many other, that explored new forms of interaction freeing the composer and musician from the ‘tyranny’ of the fixed tempered Piano keyboard (which at the beginning of electronic music instrument design was a fairly recent standard). Though this experiment was ultimately doomed due to commercial pressure on instrument designers to provide simulations of existing instruments on a fixed tempered scale for popular music, the concept survived into the 1960s in ‘serious’ experimental music with the era of the Electronic Music Studio; GRM, Milan, WDR, Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center etc. and even Moog (in the original instruments) and Buchla’smodular synthesisers. More recently interest in atonality and non-manual control has re-surfaced with software synthesis and audio computer languages.

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PDF Version Located Here: 120 Years of Electronic Music (PDF)

Michel Chion’s “Guide to Sound Objects: Pierre Schaeffer and Musical Research” (PDF)

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“Our ambition, with this Guide to Sound Objects, has always been to give researchers, musicians, music-lovers and all who are directly or indirectly interested in the sound-universe an unbiased, clear and dependable tool (if this can be done) for a better knowledge and understanding of Pierre Schaeffer’s considerable contribution to this field, by means of an inventory of the ideas and concepts developed in his most important work, the Traité des Objets Musicaux.”

Download PDF : Guide To Sound Objects

Recreating the sound of Tutankhamun’s trumpets

Tutankhamun’s trumpet was one of the rare artefacts stolen from the Cairo Museum during the recent uprising. The 3,000-year-old instrument is rarely played, but a 1939 BBC radio recording captured its haunting sound.

BBC Link:  Tutankhamun’s trumpets

io9 Link:    Tutankhamun’s trumpets

YouTube:  Tutankhamun’s trumpets

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1939 Recording: BBC Recording

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Tutankhamun’s military trumpet is one of three known examples of this instrument preserved from ancient Egypt. It was fashioned from metal sheets covered with gold.

The mouthpiece is in the shape of a cylindrical sleeve with a silver ring at the outer end, fixed to a tube. On the outside of the bell is a panel depicting the king wearing the Blue Crown and holding the crook scepter “Heka”. He stands before a shrine containing the figure of the god Ptah in the form of a mummy.

The inscription reads, “The Great One, Ptah, south-of-his-wall, Lord of Truth, Creator of all that the king receives, Life from Amun-Re, King of all Gods. He who rests his other hand on the king’s shoulders, behind the falcon-headed god, Re-Horakhty, the good god, Lord of Gold”.

All the figures are shown standing under the hieroglyphic sign for heaven and the baseline symbolizes the earth.

Translation of text:
“The Great One, Ptah, south-of-his-wall, Lord of Truth, Creator of all that the king receives, Life from Amun-Re, King of all Gods. He who rests his other hand on the king’s shoulders, behind the falcon-headed god, Re-Horakhty, the good god, Lord of Gold”.

Via: http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/ (Dead Link)

Making Music with Cosmic Rays: Kosmophone is a gamma-ray spectrometer controlling a MIDI synth

This octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, about a million times higher frequency than the octave our eyes respond to, contains very little energy that originates in our solar system. Almost all of the energy in this band is a result of unbelievably energetic radiation coming from the far reaches of the universe, ‘Cosmic Rays’. Fortunately, they tend not to make it all the way through the approximately 100 miles of air over our heads. As they smash their way through the atmosphere the collisions produce energetic emissions and it is these secondary emissions the Kosmophone responds to. The energy level of each detected event is measured and that information is sent to the MIDI control port of a music synthesizer. The ‘cosmic data’ is not altered or supplemented in any way and would be presumed to be completely random.

The measured distribution of energy values is indeed very uniform and the rate does not vary from local day to night. Apparently the normal output of our sun contains no significant gamma rays (which is a very good thing for us!) but they are produced in bursts during solar flares.

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Click Here To Visit Page: Making Music with Cosmic Rays