Andrey Smirnov: Sound in Z: Experiments in Sound and Electronic Music in Early 20th-century Russia (2013)

Sound in Z supplies the astounding and long-lost chapter in the early story of electronic music: the Soviet experiment, a chapter that runs from 1917 to the late 1930s.

Complete post at:  Monoskop Log

Video at Vimeo:

Andrey Smirnov’s Sound In Z

Russian Sound Pioneers

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Clara Rockmore plays the terpsitone, an electronic instrument invented by Léon Theremin, at Carnegie Hall in 1932 

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“Tones from out of Nowhere”: Rudolph Pfenninger and the Archaeology of Synthetic Sound (PDF)

In this essay from New Media, Old Media [2006], (originally published in Grey Room) Levin proposes an alternative history that takes into account underexamined developments in synthetic sound reproduction. While contemporary accounts of new media make it sound like threats to “real” or indexical sound only come with digitization, Levin explores well-documented events in the history of sythentic or “hand-written” sound by analog means.

Press Here To Download The PDF: Tones From Nowhere

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Lord Kelvin’s Harmonic Synthesizer 1873

This device was designed and built in the laboratory and instrument shop of the Physics Dept. of the Case School of Applied Sciences.  It is built from Lord Kelvin’s harmonic synthesizer design of 1873.  This may be the world’s first additive synthesizer.  More information about the project is here:

 Physics Dept. of the Case School of Applied Sciences

The Harmonic Synthesizer was used was used by Dayton Miller to check the results produced by the harmonic analyzer against the original phonodeik curves.

The phonodeik is an instrument designed by Dayton Miller. It allows one  to photographically record the shape of complex sound waves more precisely than previously possible.

Phonodeik

This all started with Lord Kelvin inventing an analog computer to predict tides.

Mogees: A Project That Uses Microphones To Turn Any Surface Into An Interactive Board

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Users plug any contact microphone onto a surface — be it a tree, a cupboard, a piece of glass or even a balloon. They can then record several different types of touch using their hands or any objects that cause a sound — so one sound could be a hand slap, another could be a finger tap and another could be hitting the surface with a drumstick. Users can train the system to detect new types of touch recording them just once

Press Here To Enter The Site: Mogees