120 Years Of Electronic Music

120 Years of Electronic Music* is a project that outlines and analyses the history and development of electronic musical instruments from around 1880 onwards.

Helmholtz

Press Here To Enter The Main Site: 120 Years Of Electronic Music 

The ideas put forward in Ferrucio Busoni’s ‘Sketch of a New Aesthetic of Music’ (1907) inspired a generation of composers to explore micro-tonal and varied intonation and Hermann von Helmholtz’s ‘On the Sensations of Tone’ (1863) provided an understanding of the physics of sound suggesting the possibility of creating an unlimited palette of tones and shapes beyond the restriction of traditional instrumentation. This lead directly to the design of several new instrument; Thadeus Cahill’s Telharmonium (1897) and Jörg Mager’s Sphäraphon (1920s) amongst many other, that explored new forms of interaction freeing the composer and musician from the ‘tyranny’ of the fixed tempered Piano keyboard (which at the beginning of electronic music instrument design was a fairly recent standard). Though this experiment was ultimately doomed due to commercial pressure on instrument designers to provide simulations of existing instruments on a fixed tempered scale for popular music, the concept survived into the 1960s in ‘serious’ experimental music with the era of the Electronic Music Studio; GRM, Milan, WDR, Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center etc. and even Moog (in the original instruments) and Buchla’smodular synthesisers. More recently interest in atonality and non-manual control has re-surfaced with software synthesis and audio computer languages.

32rhythmicon

ThereminBrochure03

TelharmoniumtestP108

musicaltelegraf

PDF Version Located Here: 120 Years of Electronic Music (PDF)

Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Acoustics Project: Sound Of A 3000 Year Old Instrument

 

Enter The Site Here: Chavín de Huántar

“The Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Acoustics Project, part of the Chavín de Huántar Investigation and Conservation Project (Proyecto de Investigaciones y Conservación Chavín de Huántar, under the auspices of the Instituto Nacional de Cultura, Perú) seeks to explore the architectural and instrumental acoustics of Chavín de Huántar, a 3000-year old pre-Inca ceremonial center in the north-central sierra of Perú. The site complex includes an extensive network of labyrinthine corridors, shafts, and drains built of stone block, intact and primarily without post-period modification since the end of monumental construction around 600 B.C. The project has several aims: to measure, analyze, archive, and model the architectural and instrumental acoustics of Chavín, culminating in simulations for public interface and new archaeological research tools.”

MAX Demos For Music, Audio and MIDI Training-Excellent!

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I especially like this great MIDI tool/reference patch

National Science Foundation CCLI Grant
Linking Science, Art, and Practice Through Digital Sound
This project’s objective is to develop curricular material that explains the science and mathematics of digital sound in a way that makes their relationship to applications clear, using examples from theatre, movies, and music production. This is a collaborative project among computer science, education, and digital sound design professors at a liberal arts university and a performing arts conservatory.
The intention is to engage students’ interest in science by linking it more tightly to practice, including artistic applications. The vision is to draw more students to the study of computer science by means of its exciting connections with art and digital media.

ACOUSTIC ECOLOGY | Home

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AcousticEcology.org is the website of the Acoustic Ecology Institute, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. The Acoustic Ecology Institute was founded in 2003 as a spin-off of EarthEar.com, a commercial soundscape art catalog.

AcousticEcology.org provides access to news, academic research, public policy advocates, and articles and essays about sound and listening. We hope that these diverse threads of information and passion will be of service to policy makers, the media, and interested individuals. Please be in touch with any comments or feedback you may have. [SEE SITE HIGHLIGHTS]

A sampling of Acoustic Ecology Institute Activities

Wrote comprehensive research overview on seismic survey airguns (January 2004) [MORE]
Moderated panel on Ocean Noise at the 8th International Wildlife Law Conference (New Orleans, November 2004)
Presenting soundscape awareness programs in Santa Fe Public Schools (ongoing)
Organized Acoustic Ecology Lecture Series at College of Santa Fe (20042/5 to 2006/7 academic years) [MORE]
Participated in the formation of the American Society for Acoustic Ecology, AEI founder Jim Cummings elected first President of ASAE. [MORE]
Guest edited a special Ocean Noise edition of the Journal of International Wildlife Law and Policy (published in 2007)
Member of the curatorial team for Ear to the Earth, a symposium (December 2005) and festival (March 2005) hosted by the EMF in New York. [MORE]
Plenary speaker at Alberta oil and gas Spring Noise Conference, 2007 and 2009
Invited participant in Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans Science Advisory Committee to assess the effectiveness of seismis survey mitigation measures, 2009

Tone Generator-Create Audio Test Tones, Sweeps or Noise Waveforms

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Wiki:

A signal generator, also known variously as function generator, pitch generator, arbitrary waveform generator, digital pattern generator or frequency generator is an electronic device that generates repeating or non-repeating electronic signals (in either the analog or digital domains). They are generally used in designing, testing, troubleshooting, and repairing electronic or electroacoustic devices; though they often have artistic uses as well.

There are many different types of signal generators, with different purposes and applications (and at varying levels of expense); in general, no device is suitable for all possible applications.

Traditionally, signal generators have been embedded hardware units, but since the age of multimedia-PCs, flexible, programmable software tone generators have also been available.