MAX Demos For Music, Audio and MIDI Training-Excellent!

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I especially like this great MIDI tool/reference patch

National Science Foundation CCLI Grant
Linking Science, Art, and Practice Through Digital Sound
This project’s objective is to develop curricular material that explains the science and mathematics of digital sound in a way that makes their relationship to applications clear, using examples from theatre, movies, and music production. This is a collaborative project among computer science, education, and digital sound design professors at a liberal arts university and a performing arts conservatory.
The intention is to engage students’ interest in science by linking it more tightly to practice, including artistic applications. The vision is to draw more students to the study of computer science by means of its exciting connections with art and digital media.

Hard Day’s Night Chord-Dm7(9/11) ?

Waveform, Spectrogram and Spectrum Created In Sonic Visualizer

 

The Famous Chord Itself


via: NoiseAddicts

“It’s the most famous chord in rock ‘n’ roll, an instantly recognizable twang rolling through the open strings on George Harrison’s 12-string Rickenbacker. It evokes a Pavlovian response from music fans as they sing along to the refrain that follows:
“It’s been a hard day’s night
And I’ve been working like a dog”
The opening chord to “A Hard Day’s Night” is also famous because, for 40 years, no one quite knew exactly what chord Harrison was playing.
There were theories aplenty and musicians, scholars and amateur guitar players all gave it a try, but it took a Dalhousie mathematician to figure out the exact formula.
Four years ago, inspired by reading news coverage about the song’s 40th anniversary, Jason Brown of Dalhousie’s Department of Mathematics decided to try and see if he could apply a mathematical calculation known as Fourier transform to solve the Beatles’ riddle. The process allowed him to decompose the sound into its original frequencies using computer software and parse out which notes were on the record.
It worked, to a point: the frequencies he found didn’t match the known instrumentation on the song. “George played a 12-string Rickenbacker, Lennon had his six string, Paul had his bass…none of them quite fit what I found,” he explains. “Then the solution hit me: it wasn’t just those instruments. There was a piano in there as well, and that accounted for the problematic frequencies.”
“I started playing guitar because I heard a Beatles record—that was it for my piano lessons,” says Brown. “I had tried to play the first chord of the song many takes over the years. It sounds outlandish that someone could create a mystery around a chord from a time where artists used such simple recording techniques. It’s quite remarkable.”
Dr. Brown deduces that another George—George Martin, the Beatles producer—also played on the chord, adding a piano chord that included an F note impossible to play with the other notes on the guitar. The resulting chord was completely different than anything found in the literature about the song to date, which is one reason why Dr. Brown’s findings garnered international attention. He laughs that he may be the only mathematician ever to be published in Guitar Player magazine.
Music and math are not really that far apart,” he says. “They’ve found that children that listen to music do better at math, because math and music both use the brain in similar ways. The best music is analytical and pattern-filled and mathematics has a lot of aesthetics to it. They complement each other well.”

With Added Discussion via Marginal Revolution

Detailed Discussion via Everything2

Reference

Native Instruments Kontakt Scripting Tools

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Excellent Kontakt Tools

Features:

Download Now
Windows (4.8 MB) new
Mac OSX (17 MB) new
If you use and like this program please feel free to make a donation to support the development:

  • Syntax highlighting of script code.
  • Indent/dedent selected code (you can indent/dedent several rows with one key press).
  • Automatical reindentation of selected code
  • Pressing F5 runs compiles the code (this lets you declare and use user-defined functions and organize variables into families) and puts the code on the clipboard, ready to be pasted into K2.
    The compiler now reports common errors and automatically moves the cursor to the right place to let you fix them. Furthermore the syntax has been extended.
  • Pressing F10 exports the script to syntax highlighted HTML and automatically opens the page in your browser for previewing.
  • Code completion (pressing Ctrl+Space fills in the rest of the current word).
  • Call tips (pressing Ctrl+Shift+Space shows documentation for the function being called).
  • Parenthesis matching. When you write “)” the corresponding “(” is highlighted.
  • Goto line function
  • Ability to switch between fixed width fonts and variable width ones
  • Ability to choose number of steps (spaces) of indentation and an option to reindentate the whole script when this setting is changed.
  • Unlimited undo / redo
  • The compiler can optionally output compacted code (reducing it’s size by >50%) to help dealing with a K2 bug causing slowdowns for large scripts.
  • ‘end …’ lines can optionally be automatically added and there’s support for automatic indentation of pasted code.
  • Navigation panel which lets one quickly jump to any callback or function.
  • Tabbed interface for editing multiple scripts at the same time.
  • new Code folding and improved syntax highlighting. It is off by default since it makes files slower to load, but can be activated in the Settings menu.