Electronic Music Review N°4

Contents:
EMscope
Tristram Cary– Superserialismus: Is There a Cure?
Symposium: Mixers and Level Controls
Robert A. Moog- Introduction to Mixers and Level Controls
James Seawright- Fundamental Concepts of Electronic Music Mixers
Gerald Shapiro- Functional Design of Electronic Music Mixers
Hugh Le Caine- Some Applications of Electrical Level Controls
Frederic Rzewski- A Photoresistor Mixer For Live Performance
Fernando von Reichenbach- The Sound Level Photoprogrammer
Robert A. Moog- Construction of a Simple Mixer
Paul Ketoff- The-Synket
Kurt Stone, Joel Chadabe- Reviews
Contributors

Download The PDF Here: Electronic Music Review N°4 

The Complete Series Is At UbuWeb: UbuWeb Electronic Music Resources  As Always, Thanks to UbuWeb!

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Electronic Music Review N°1 (Jan 1967)

Contents:
EMscope
Raymond Wilding-White- Happy Birthday
Harold Bode- The Multiplier-Type Ring Modulator
Karlheinz Stockhausen- Notes on Mixtur (1964)
Robert Ceely- Electronic Music Three Ways
Symposium: Programmed Control
Robert A. Moog- Introduction to Programmed Control
Emmanuel Ghent- The Coordinome in Relation to Electronic Music
George w. Logemann- Techniques for Programmed Electronic Music Synthesis
James Gabura and Gustav Ciamaga- Digital Computer Control of Sound Generating Apparatus for the Production of Electronic Music
Luciano Berio- Remarks to the Kind Lady of Baltimore
Contributors

Press Here To Download: Electronic Music Review 1

Thanks To UbuWeb

An Anthology Of Chance Operations

This PDF is very interesting and difficult to place in any single category.  Here is a Wiki quote: “In 1961 Flynt coined the term concept art in the Neo-Dada, proto-Fluxus book An Anthology of Chance Operations (published by Jackson Mac Low and La Monte Young) that was released in 1963. An Anthology of Chance Operations contained seminal works by Fluxus artists such as Al HansenGeorge Brecht and Dick Higgins. Flynt’s concept art, he maintained, devolved from cognitive nihilism, from insights about the vulnerabilities of logic and mathematics. Drawing on an exclusively syntactical paradigm of logic and mathematics, concept art was meant jointly to supersede mathematics and the formalistic music then current in serious art music circles. Therefore, Flynt maintained, to merit the label concept art, a work had to be an object-critique of logic or mathematics or objective structure.” It has nothing to do withconcept art as the term is used to describe a form of illustration in the realm of the digital arts.”

Download here: An Anthology Of Chance Operations       File From UbuWeb

U B U W E B – Film & Video: Iannis Xenakis – NEG-ALE (1960)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

NEG-ALE (1960) (8:08)
for piccolo, horn, cello, and percussion
with the film “Vasarely” 

In 1960, Xenakis composed the music NEG-ALE for P. Kassovitz’s “Vasarely”, an abstract film on the artwork of Op-Art master Victor Vasarely, documenting an exhibition of that painter’s work at the Denise Renée Gallery. Xenakis provided music in the form of a piece entitled NEG-ALE for piccolo, horn, cello and percussion, but later withdrew the work from his catalogue.

Marshall McLuhan-“the medium is the message”

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete” – Buckminster Fuller
Wiki: “Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar — a professor of English literature, a literary critic, a rhetorician, and a communication theorist. McLuhan’s work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory. McLuhan is known for the expressions “the medium is the message” and “global village”. McLuhan was a fixture in media discourse from the late 1960s to his death and he continues to be an influential and controversial figure. More than ten years after his death he was named the “patron saint” of Wired magazine.”

The Medium is the Massage:Audio From 33/3 Record

Thanks To UbuWeb

Press Here For A Link To Rare McLuhan Audio At: http://starlarvae.blogspot.com/

Reference

 

John Cage Q & A Interview (Audio)

John Milton Cage Jr. (September 5, 1912 – August 12, 1992) was an American composer, philosopher, poet, music theorist, artist, printmaker, and amateur mycologist and mushroom collector. A pioneer of chance music, electronic music and non-standard use of musical instruments, Cage was one of the leading figures of the post-war avant-garde. Critics have lauded him as one of the most influential American composers of the 20th century. He was also instrumental in the development of modern dance, mostly through his association with choreographer Merce Cunningham, who was also Cage’s romantic partner for most of their lives.

Cage is perhaps best known for his 1952 composition 4′33″, the three movements of which are performed without a single note being played. The content of the composition is meant to be perceived as the sounds of the environment that the listeners hear while it is performed,[6] rather than merely as four minutes and thirty three seconds of silence, and the piece became one of the most controversial compositions of the twentieth century. Another famous creation of Cage’s is the prepared piano (a piano with its sound altered by placing various objects in the strings), for which he wrote numerous dance-related works and a few concert pieces, the best known of which is Sonatas and Interludes (1946–48).

His teachers included Henry Cowell (1933) and Arnold Schoenberg (1933–35), both known for their radical innovations in music and coincidentally their shared love of mushrooms, but Cage’s major influences lay in various Eastern cultures. Through his studies of Indian philosophy and Zen Buddhism in the late 1940s, Cage came to the idea of chance-controlled music, which he started composing in 1951. The I Ching, an ancient Chinese classic text on changing events, became Cage’s standard composition tool for the rest of his life. In a 1957 lecture, Experimental Music, he described music as “a purposeless play” which is “an affirmation of life – not an attempt to bring order out of chaos nor to suggest improvements in creation, but simply a way of waking up to the very life we’re living”.

Click On The Links Below To Hear The Interview

Part 1

Part 2

Many Thanks To UbuWeb!