SuperCollider Laconicism Audio Thru A Digitech GSP 1101 & TimeBender Spectrum Visualization

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Supercollider

Laconicism

Reference

Supercollider Meets Guitar Effects Boxes Part 2

Almost the exact same setup as is my previous post here but I used a different preset in Laconicism and ran the audio through a Digitech GSP 1101 instead of the Vox.

Again, thanks to EarSlap

Supercollider Meets Guitar Effects Boxes

I decided to try a little experiment.  As many already know, Supercollider is a very powerful audio language.  I am not a programmer so I tend to seek out ready to run software as opposed to downloading the builds and making it custom to my needs.  I found this great little, ready to run, Supercollider application called Laconicism.  I ran the audio output from Laconicism through a Vox Satchurator distortion pedal and a Digitech TimeBender Delay.  I recorded the distorted and delayed output into Live, made a MP3 and posted it here.  It’s really a little long but shows what can be done with only two guitar effects boxes.

Laconicism At EarSlap

SuperCollider-A Real Time Audio Synthesis Programming Language

If you are willing to spend the time and have a background in programming, this is a great opensource cross platform audio language.

From: http://supercollider.sourceforge.net//

SuperCollider is an environment and programming language for real time audio synthesis and algorithmic composition. It provides an interpreted object-oriented language which functions as a network client to a state of the art, realtime sound synthesis server.

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SuperCollider

Press Here to listen to or download SC140, an album of 22 pieces programmed entirely in Supercollider by artists from around the world, each piece created with just 140 characters of code.

— ixi software —

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— ixi software —.

Some very interesting experimental software for Mac and Windows, all free!

From the website:

“ixi audio is an experimental project concerned with the creation of digital musical instruments and environments for generative music. We are interested in the computer as a workshop for building non-conventional tools for musicians, i.e. not trying to imitate or copy the tools that we know from the world of acoustic instruments or studio technology. We currently work with open source software such as SuperCollider, ChucK and Pure Data, but our aim is to distribute our applications packaged in a way that allows everybody to use them. Simplicity and ease of use together with depth in interaction and expressive scope is the aim of our experimental music software.”