MetaMix (2002)-Software Audio & Art

Press Here To Access: MetaMix

MetaMix is a cross between a musical composition, a digital audio player, an interactive experience, a software tool, and a work of conceptual art. Feed MetaMix your favorite audio track and listen as familiar music is transformed into a new listening experience. MetaMix superimposes new musical structures onto existing music by turning special mathematical integer sequences into new musical forms. These musical forms are used to “remix” the audio track you choose.

I recorded a short piano piece and processed it through MetaMix:

Abstract Piano Piece #1

Advertisements

MEAPsoft: A Program For Automatically Segmenting and Rearranging Music

Press Here To Enter The Site: MeapSoft

MEAPsoft works by (a) segmenting original audio up into individual beats or events, (b) calculating some features for each segment, and (c) matching or rearranging segments from one or more pieces to create a new piece of music.

MEAPsoft comes with a wide and increasing range of feature extraction routines, and algorithms for matching and rearranging the segments (called “composers”). MEAPsoft is written in Java, and makes it pretty easy to write your own feature extractors and composers.

 

Lexikon-Sonate: Algorithmic Music Generator (OSX)

Press Here To Enter The Site: Lexikon-Sonate

“Lexikon-Sonate is an interactive realtime composition environment for musical composition and live performances. It takes advantage of composition algorithms that has been developed by Karlheinz Essl since 1985. With this algorithmic music generator on can easily create fascinating and complex musical structures on the fly. Furthermore, Lexikon-Sonate is an infinite music installation that can run on a computer for years without repeating itself. Finally, Lexikon-Sonate can be used as an instrument for live performance of electronic music.”

 

MusicAlgorithms: Tools For Algorithmic Composition of Music

Press Here To Enter The Site: MusicAlgorithms

“Students of music composition can explore algorithmic composition, while others can create musical representations of models for the purpose of aural interpretation and analysis. Here, the algorithmic process is used in a creative context so that users can convert sequences of numbers into sounds.”

 

John Cage Q & A Interview (Audio)

John Milton Cage Jr. (September 5, 1912 – August 12, 1992) was an American composer, philosopher, poet, music theorist, artist, printmaker, and amateur mycologist and mushroom collector. A pioneer of chance music, electronic music and non-standard use of musical instruments, Cage was one of the leading figures of the post-war avant-garde. Critics have lauded him as one of the most influential American composers of the 20th century. He was also instrumental in the development of modern dance, mostly through his association with choreographer Merce Cunningham, who was also Cage’s romantic partner for most of their lives.

Cage is perhaps best known for his 1952 composition 4′33″, the three movements of which are performed without a single note being played. The content of the composition is meant to be perceived as the sounds of the environment that the listeners hear while it is performed,[6] rather than merely as four minutes and thirty three seconds of silence, and the piece became one of the most controversial compositions of the twentieth century. Another famous creation of Cage’s is the prepared piano (a piano with its sound altered by placing various objects in the strings), for which he wrote numerous dance-related works and a few concert pieces, the best known of which is Sonatas and Interludes (1946–48).

His teachers included Henry Cowell (1933) and Arnold Schoenberg (1933–35), both known for their radical innovations in music and coincidentally their shared love of mushrooms, but Cage’s major influences lay in various Eastern cultures. Through his studies of Indian philosophy and Zen Buddhism in the late 1940s, Cage came to the idea of chance-controlled music, which he started composing in 1951. The I Ching, an ancient Chinese classic text on changing events, became Cage’s standard composition tool for the rest of his life. In a 1957 lecture, Experimental Music, he described music as “a purposeless play” which is “an affirmation of life – not an attempt to bring order out of chaos nor to suggest improvements in creation, but simply a way of waking up to the very life we’re living”.

Click On The Links Below To Hear The Interview

Part 1

Part 2

Many Thanks To UbuWeb!