MEAPsoft: A Program For Automatically Segmenting and Rearranging Music

Press Here To Enter The Site: MeapSoft

MEAPsoft works by (a) segmenting original audio up into individual beats or events, (b) calculating some features for each segment, and (c) matching or rearranging segments from one or more pieces to create a new piece of music.

MEAPsoft comes with a wide and increasing range of feature extraction routines, and algorithms for matching and rearranging the segments (called “composers”). MEAPsoft is written in Java, and makes it pretty easy to write your own feature extractors and composers.

 

Drumbot: A Free Online Drum Machine

Press Here To Enter The Site: Drumbot

“Drumbot is the next best thing to a real drummer. Full song loops and tons of grooves.

Designed specifically for non-drummers for use as backing tracks during song composition.

We’ve partnered with real drummers, (can you think of a better beat maker?) who’ve created entire songs, from intro to outro, then organized everything to help you discover that perfect groove.

Each of the hand-crafted “songs” consists of a collection of loops (loop set) that all run at the same BPM and are all inter-related.

Most loop sets have multiple intro’s, verses, chorus’, fills, crashes and outros.

You can organize these basic building blocks into a unique arrangement that suits your needs.”

 

1-Bit Symphony: An Electronic Composition in Five Movements on a Microchip

Very Clever “Hardware CD”

$29

Available Here: 1Bit

“Tristan Perich’s 1-Bit Symphony is an electronic composition in five movements on a single microchip. Though housed in a CD jewel case like his first circuit album (1-Bit Music 2004-05), 1-Bit Symphony is not a recording in the traditional sense; it literally “performs” its music live when turned on. A complete electronic circuit—programmed by the artist and assembled by hand—plays the music through a headphone jack mounted into the case itself. The album is available from Cantaloupe Music.”

cfxr (OSX) sfxr (Windows) – Sound Effects Software

OSX Version At This Page:

Enter: cfxr

Original Windows Version:

Enter: sfxr

Info From Web Site:

“This is a little tool I made in connection with the 10th Ludum Dare competition held in December 2007. Its original purpose was to provide a simple means of getting basic sound effects into a game for those people who were working hard to get their entries done within the 48 hours and didn’t have time to spend looking for suitable ways of doing this.
The idea was that they could just hit a few buttons in this application and get some largely randomized effects that were custom in the sense that the user could accept/reject each proposed sound.

It turned out to work rather well and a lot of the entrants used it, which is cool. Anyone else in the same situation (need some basic sound effects, don’t really care about top quality, have no idea where to get them) should find it pretty useful, if nothing else then just as placeholder sounds to kill the silence until final content has been produced.

Basic usage involves hitting the randomize button (or one of the other buttons to your left if you need a specific standard sound), listen to the generated sound, then deciding if it sounds ok or not. If it does, then export it to .WAV and you’re done, if not – just hit the button again and get something different.
All the parameters used to create each sound are manually tweakable to allow fine-tuning if you feel like getting your hands dirty. Space is a useful shortcut to play the current sound.

There will probably be a minor update of this in the near future, adding some convenient features.

Source code is available and you’re free to use it for anything you please. I’ve put it under the MIT free software license.”

Aldous Huxley – Mike Wallace Interview

Vodpod videos no longer available.

The Mike Wallace Interview
Aldous Huxley
 

The Aldous Huxley interview was digitized by the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and Quinn Stewart, School of Information, University of Texas and indexed by New Media UFM Guatemala in March 2007.

Project coordinated by: Steve Wilson (HRHRC), Quinn Stewart (School of Information, University of Texas) and Grete Pasch (UFM). Rich media players and software tools by GLIFOS. Hosting and technical support provided by Shane Williams, David Wilson, and the School of Information IT Lab.

Made possible by a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

Wiki:Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famousHuxley family. He spent the later part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death in 1963. Best known for his novels including Brave New World and a wide-ranging output of essays, Huxley also edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories, poetry, travel writing, and film stories and scripts. 

Aldous Huxley was a humanist and pacifist, and he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophicalmysticism.[1] He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics.

By the end of his life Huxley was considered, in some academic circles, a leader of modern thought and an intellectual of the highest rank, and highly regarded as one of the most prominent explorers of visual communication and sight-related theories as well.[

SunVox – Multiplatform Modular Music Creation Studio-All Platforms

Interesting New Synthesizer

Press Here To Enter The Site: SunVox


Key features
  • Modular interface.
  • Highly optimized synth algorithms.
  • Flexible architecture: SunVox can working on variuos devices. For example: PDA with slow CPU – 16bit sound (fixed point arithmetic); or big PC with powerfull CPU: 32bit sound (floating point arithmetic).
  • Built-in synthesizers:
    • FM synthesizer;
    • Generator (saw,triangle,square,noise waveforms);
    • Kicker;
    • Sampler (supported formats: WAV, XI, AIFF);
    • SpectraVoice (FFT-based synthesizer for analog-like pads);
    • DC Blocking Filter;
    • Delay;
    • Distortion;
    • Echo;
    • EQ;
    • Filter (Low-pass, High-pass, Band-pass, Notch);
    • Flanger;
    • LFO;
    • Loop;
    • Reverb (with DC Blocking Filter);
    • Vocal Filter;
    • Vibrato.
  • Supported systems: Windows, Linux (x86/x86_64), Mac OS X, PalmOS, WindowsCE (Windows Mobile), iPhone/iPad.
  • Export to WAV.

 


MusicAlgorithms: Tools For Algorithmic Composition of Music

Press Here To Enter The Site: MusicAlgorithms

“Students of music composition can explore algorithmic composition, while others can create musical representations of models for the purpose of aural interpretation and analysis. Here, the algorithmic process is used in a creative context so that users can convert sequences of numbers into sounds.”

 

This Sealed Packet Contained The World’s First Recorded Sound (firstsounds.org)

via: FirstSounds



“Chi crederia che sotto forme umane e sotto queste pastorali spoglie fosse nascosto un Dio? Non mica un–[“Who would believe that under human form and under this pastoral garb there would be found a God? Not only a….”]. As of mid-May 2009, this phonautogram of the opening lines of Torquato Tasso‘s pastoral drama Aminta is the earliest audible record of recognizable human speech–at least, recognizable enough to follow if you already know the words. (The April 9, 1860 recording of Au Clair de la Lune appears to be earlier, but it is sung, not spoken.) Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville recorded it for the physicist Henri Victor Regnault, probably in April or May 1860, as a “study of the tonic accent,” so he was more interested in capturing the intonation than the words anyway. But there’s a mistake in the recorded recitation. “I was wrong,” Scott wrote at the bottom: “it should be umane forme.” By apologizing for reversing the word order, Scott indirectly identifies himself as the speaker.”