Oldest Know Recording Of Computer Music (With Audio}

Wiki:

The Ferranti Mark 1, also known as the Manchester Electronic Computer in its sales literature,[1] and thus sometimes called the Manchester Ferranti, was the world’s first commercially available general-purpose electronic computer.  Included in the Ferranti Mark 1’s instruction set was a hoot command, which enabled the machine to give auditory feedback to its operators. The sound generated could be altered in pitch, a feature which was exploited when the Mark 1 made the earliest known recording of computer music, playing a medley which included “God Save the King“, “Baa Baa Black Sheep“, and “In the Mood”. The recording was made by the BBC towards the end of 1951, and the programming was done by Christopher Strachey, a maths teacher at Harrow and a friend of Alan Turing. It was not however the first computer to have played music – CSIRAC, Australia’s first digital computer, achieved that with a rendition of Colonel Bogey.

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